Wednesday, July 31, 2013

The Room Provides Alex Gibney with a Place to Call Home

New York post production boutique provides finishing services for director’s “Wikileaks” and “Eagles” documentaries.

NEW YORK—The Room, a boutique finishing facility located within Technicolor – PostWorks, New York, recently wrapped post-production on We Steal Secrets: The History of WikiLeaks and History of the Eagles, two new documentaries from producer/director Alex Gibney. The Room provided editorial conforming and final color grading for the docs prior to their debut at this year’s Sundance Film Festival and general release. We Steal Secrets is currently in theatrical release; History of the Eagles is currently airing on Showtime, where it is posting record numbers for a documentary.

Hollywood's Chainsaw Launches Feature Film Division

Independent post-production facility unveils new 4K DI theater, adds Annalise Kurinsky as Director of Feature Services, DI Colorist Doug Delaney and Finishing Editor John Pehlke.
Hollywood—Chainsaw, the boutique Hollywood post production facility with credits ranging from American Idol to the Academy Awards, has launched a new division focused on post-production services for features. The company has built an all-new 4K digital intermediate theater at its facility on Orange in Hollywood and brought on a colorist-editor-producer team with lengthy experience in preparing films for digital cinema, film theatrical, broadcast and home entertainment release. The new division will target both studio and independent features.
Founded by Emmy-winning editors Bill DeRonde and Mike Polito, Chainsaw has established itself as a premiere independent provider of editorial and post-production services for scripted and unscripted television series, television specials and other television content. It has done so by pairing top flight technology and a flexible workflow, with the industry’s best creative talent. It is now applying that same formula to features.

Rising Sun Pictures Recreates Atomic Blast as Part of a Huge VFX Package for "The Wolverine"

Australian VFX studio delivers more than 25 minutes for the latest edition to Fox’s “X-Men” franchise.

Adelaide, South Australia—Rising Sun Pictures (RSP) created more than 260 visual effects shots for The Wolverine, the new action film from Director James Mangold and Twentieth Century Fox. RSP helped to recreate the World War II atomic bomb attack on Nagasaki, Japan. It also produced digital environments for a number of sequences, including a scene set in a snow-covered Japanese village, and combat effects such as digital copies of Wolverine’s iconic claws for use in numerous scenes involving challenging stunts.
The work was conducted under the supervision of the production’s VFX Supervisor Philip Brennan, and VFX Producer Jamie Stevenson. RSP’s team was led by VFX Supervisor Tim Crosbie.

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Tom Feiler and Tribal Worldwide Say “Toys Shouldn’t Play for You”

Feiler, who is represented in the U.S. by Accomplice Media, directs three ads that poke fun at digital toys.

SANTA MONICA, CA—Tom Feiler has directed three web spots for the Toronto-based children’s store Kol Kid and Tribal Worldwide Toronto. The spots cleverly communicate how tech toys can’t always fulfill the joy of traditional toys. The ads are the centerpiece of a new, multi-faceted campaign for the store celebrating the value of “simple play.”

Feiler, a father of two children, says that he strongly identifies with the store’s philosophy towards play. “With electronic toys, whether it’s a console game or something else, kids are asked to manipulate stories that were created by someone else. The problems have been set,” he explains. “Traditional toys are inherently tactile and they require kids to use their imaginations.”

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Codex Introduces Codex Backbone and Production Server

Codex Debuts Codex Backbone at Siggraph 2013


London, UK - Codex, who design and manufacture high-performance workflow tools for feature film, television and commercials production, today announces an expansion of its product range with the Codex Production Server and Backbone. 

The Codex Backbone is a hybrid system with productions taking advantage of local appliances - Codex Production Server - along with the distributed hardware of the Cloud through the Codex Backbone. Based on the proven technology of the Codex Vault, the Codex Production Server is a repository for all digital files and metadata generated during principal photography. 
Codex has sought input from key players in the visual effects industry, including Visual Effects Producer Ron Ames, during the initial development. "I am very excited to see the new tools coming from Codex," says Ames. "It makes perfect sense from capture to archive with Codex systems. The new digital asset management system will extend the Codex presence from on-set through post. Continuing the information flow in one unified system is the innovation I have been waiting for."

Monday, July 22, 2013

Directing Duo Siegel & McGehee Joins Bully Pictures

Directors of “What Maisie Knew” and “The Deep End” enter the advertising market for the first time.

LOS ANGELES - David Siegel and Scott McGehee, the directing duo behind such acclaimed films as The Deep End, Bee Season, Uncertainty and Suture, has signed with Bully Pictures for exclusive, national representation in commercials.  Siegel & McGehee’s current film, What Maisie Knew, starring Julianne Moore and Alexander Skarsgard, has been received with glowing reviews.

Sonzero Films Joins Forces with Bang Bang Films to Form New Joint Venture in India

LOS ANGELES—International Director Jim Sonzero and Bang Bang Films, India’s International production company, have joined forces to create a unique joint venture- SONZERO FILMS INDIA/BANG BANG. Primarily focused on beauty, lifestyle and storytelling, the new boutique has just completed its inaugural project, L’Oreal Fall Repair campaign with Bollywood actor Sonam Kapoor, and will be shooting another spot for L’Oreal starring Aishwarya Rai at the beginning of August.

Rising Sun Pictures and Flinders University Conduct Intensive Visual Effects Training

Adelaide, South Australia—Rising Sun Pictures (RSP) and Flinders University today announce the completion of their inaugural ten-week training program in visual effects. Students from across Australia participated in the high-quality, work-integrated postgraduate program, enhancing their creative and practical skills in a professional production environment.

Students spent time at the RSP Studio where supervisors guided them in developing skills in rotoscoping, camera tracking, match-moving and compositing whilst utilising high-quality training materials from a variety of feature films. The students undertook a live-action film shoot and used that material to develop work for their demo reels. Additionally, lectures and tutorials given by representatives from all RSP departments helped students understand the workings of the roles within a VFX company.

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

The Colonie Adds Senior Motion Graphics Designer Jennifer Moody

Editorial studio continues to add to its post-production services as part of an overall expansion.

CHICAGO— The Colonie, the boutique editorial and post production studio, has added Senior Motion Graphic Designer Jennifer Moody to its creative team. Moody will work alongside Senior Motion Graphics Designer Lyndsay McCully, who joined the company five years ago, in designing and producing graphic elements for commercials and other projects.

The Colonie is growing its graphics capabilities in order to meet its clients’ design needs and desire to consolidate their post-production work. “We have been receiving more requests for design work,” explains executive producer Mary Caddy, a partner and co-founder of The Colonie. “Agency creatives and producers are pulled in many directions today, and they appreciate the convenience of being able to do more of their work in one place while maintaining high creative standards.” A specialist in creative editorial, The Colonie also provides visual effects and on-line finishing services.

Monday, July 15, 2013

“No Means No”: Accomplice’s Hans Petter Moland Wins Gold Lion at Cannes for Public Service Ad that Changed Norwegian Rape Law


SANTA MONICA, CA—Women in Norway now have the same protections against unwanted sexual advances enjoyed by women in most other Western countries thanks to an award-winning public service advertising campaign conducted by Amnesty International. The group’s No Means No campaign, which last week won a Gold PR Lion at Cannes (and previously won a Gold Clio), stirred wide public outrage and eventually prompted the Norwegian government to change laws that defined rape as a sexual assault involving violence or threats, but not simply a lack of consent.

Director Georgi Banks-Davies Joins Madheart

LOS ANGELES—Georgi Banks-Davies is heading to Madheart. The British director, the subject of growing international acclaim for her work for Coca-Cola, AT&T, O2 and other brands, has chosen the boutique, Los Angeles-based production company to orchestrate her entry into the U.S. market.
“Georgi is a brilliant talent whose work is particularly relevant to today’s culture,” says Madheart executive producer Lisa Phillips. “She creates advertising that is uplifting, with a depth and richness that is both real and appropriate to the subject or brand. We are very excited to work with her.” Phillips added that Banks-Davies is currently working on a campaign for Coca-Cola via Ogilvy & Mather, Berlin, and German production company Tony Petersen Film (TPF).

Thursday, July 11, 2013

Colorflow Grades Afghanistan Doc “The Kill Team”

Berkeley, CA—Colorflow provided final post-production services for The Kill Team, an emotionally gripping documentary from Director Dan Krauss that probes one of the most troubling chapters of the Afghanistan War. The Berkeley boutique performed conform, color and final finishing for the film.

The Kill Team, which won for Best Documentary Feature at the Tribeca Film Festival and earned the Golden Gate Award at the San Francisco Film Festival, tells the story of a group of U.S. soldiers stationed in southern Afghanistan who, motivated by fear and boredom, take to murdering Afghan civilians  and then staging those killings to look like “good shoots.” The film focuses in particular on one soldier whose attempts to alert the military to the atrocities went unheeded and who later became a target of war crimes investigations. The documentary is composed of interviews with four soldiers charged in the case and family members along with news footage and amateur material shot by soldiers in the field.

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Codex Provides Recording Technology for Douglas Trumbull’s 120 FPS Experimental Short “UFOTOG”

London, UK –   Filmmaking pioneer Douglas Trumbull recently used Codex recording technology in the production of UFOTOG, the world’s first high-frame rate (120 fps), stereoscopic 3D film.  Trumbull and his production team at Trumbull Studios employed Codex Onboard S Recorders to capture 4K raw data from a pair of Canon C500 cameras, each shooting at 60 fps.  The project, which is currently in post production, is designed to demonstrate the potential of high frame rate imagery and Trumbull’s vision for a new form of immersive cinematic entertainment.

The production of UFOTOG, expected to run approximately 10 minutes, spanned several months. Trumbull (known for his groundbreaking work in creating visual effects for such films as 2001: A Space Odyssey, Close Encounters of the Third Kind and Bladerunner) and his crew first needed to design a workflow to support the capture of stereo streams of high-frame-rate, 4K raw data.
After conducting numerous tests, Trumbull chose to shoot with Canon C500 cameras due to their unique ability to shoot 4K raw at 60 fps. “I had the good fortune to work with an early version of the C500 while shooting test footage for Terrence Malick and his film Tree of Life,” Trumbull recalls. “I liked the colorimetry of the camera, the resolution, the form factor, the weight. I thought it was the perfect choice for my 3D film.”
Once the C500 was selected, the choice of Codex’s Onboard S Recorder for data capture was a foregone conclusion as it is the only recording device capable of capturing raw data at 60 fps from the Canon C500 camera. “The key thing that I wanted was raw 4K” he says.  “That results in a lot of data and only the Codex recorders could do it.”
Even so, Trumbull said that the production proved immensely challenging.  “The amount of data that we are working with is huge,” he observes. “For this 10-minute film, we have 40 terabytes of material. It’s a lot of storage, a lot of throughput, a lot of high bandwidth. The Codex recorders worked flawlessly.”
Consistently leading the way in digital recording technology, Codex recorders have become the industry’s gold standard and the obvious choice for productions with demanding or unusual workflow requirements, as well as most Hollywood blockbusters. Lightweight Codex Onboard S recorders are currently being used on the new DreamWorks SKG action film Need for Speed; some eight Codex recorders are being used to support more than 35 cameras, in many cases under the most extreme conditions.
Similarly, Codex Onboard S recorders were recently used to record 4K data from the Canon C500 at speeds up to 120 fps for the motorcycle documentary Why We Ride.
Trumbull says that it is crucial for pioneers like him to have the support of the industry’s technology leaders. “Codex and Canon have been great partners,” he says. “They’ve been fantastic.”
About Codex Digital

Codex Digital, who are based in London, England design and manufacture high-end digital equipment for motion picture and television production, products include the award-winning high-resolution media recorders and a range of media management stations to manage the entire workflow of a digital production from set to post production. The company is setting new standards for end-to-end production workflow.

For more information please visit www.codexdigital.com.

Editor’s Note: The product names and registered trademarks mentioned are each the property of their respective owners.